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Wednesday, May 28, 2008
The emphasis is on fun
EXPO IN CHICAGO Trade show rolls out what's ahead in candy and snacks
May 28, 2008


BY SANDY THORN CLARK

Flavor, ingenuity and fun are in store on America's candy and snack aisles -- at least if the 2,000 new confectionary creations and snacks unveiled last week at the National Confectioners Association's All Candy Expo at McCormick Place are an indication. Flavor abounds. Orbit gum comes in Sangria Fresca, Ice Breakers Chewy Sours in Strawberry Blast, and Go Naturally Organic Hard Candies in Pomegranate. Combo pretzel snacks have added Pizzeria, Zesty Salsa and Nacho Cheese; Crunchables baked rice snacks are available in Nacho Cheese, Barbecue or Salt and Vinegar, and Pringles Baked Wheat Stix flavors include Vanilla, Honey or Pizza.

There's ingenuity: Burger King offers Ketchup & Fries-flavored potato snacks; Arizona Jack's has 3-feet-long Whipper Snacker Beef Sticks in Pepperoni, Teriyaki and Original flavors and Trail Steaks offers smoked jerkylike beef, elk, venison, turkey and buffalo.


Some of the new candy and snack foods featured at a All Candy Expo include Jelly Belly beans in your favorite Cold Stone Creamery flavors, new packaging from Aura to promote cancer while having fresh breath (top), and Spicy Bloody Mary potato chips.

And there's plain fun: Peeps, those adorable pastel-colored marshmallow classics associated with Easter, will introduce bear-shaped Chocolate Mousse Peeps for Valentine's Day and new green or orange Peeps. Too Tarts has sugar-free spray candy in Melted Ice Cream flavors including Blueberry, Strawberry and Banana Split, and Blow Pop Minis, minus the lollipop stick, come in Watermelon, Blue Razz, Cherry and Sour Apple.

Among the showstoppers:
Yummy pastel Cold Stone Creamery Jelly Belly beans offer all of the flavor of Cold Stone's signature ice cream flavors -- Mint Mint Chocolate Chocolate Chip, Chocolate Devotion, Our Strawberry Blonde, Apple Pie a la Cold Stone and Birthday Cake Remix -- minus the drip. Also new: Jelly Belly's other new flavor -- Dark Chocolate -- and a whimsical cone-shaped ceramic dish topped with a dome filled with the Jelly Belly Ice Cream Parlor Mix. Visit www.Jelly Belly.com.

It's not just about chewing gum, it's about voting as you chew. Bonus! Peppermint sugar-free gum ($1) is available in red, white and blue Democrat or Republican packaging. Jay Klein says his Bonus Gum Co. will track sales and determine the winner at election time. Non-committed chewers can opt for Bonus! gum in Green Tea or Cranberry. Visit www.bonusgum.com/election.

Potato chips take on an adult twist, thanks to the creativity and wit of Brett Stein, mastermind behind Beer Chips in three flavors: sweet-and-salty Beer, Spicy Bloody Mary, and Margarita with Salt. Available in Whole Foods and Jewel stores, the thick-cut, kettle-style chips sell for $1.19 (2-ounce bag) and $3.69 (9-ounce bag). Visit www.beerchips.com.
Think Starbucks coffee and teas. Think premium chocolate. Think Starbucks Chocolate, an inspired, irresistible collection of Cafe Mocha, Chai, Espresso, Caramel Macchiato and Madagascar Vanilla Bean Truffles; Tazo Chai, Passion and Citron Tea-Infused Chocolate Tasting Squares, and Milk Chocolate Covered Caffe Verona Coffee Beans. Holiday time will bring Gingerbread Latte, Eggnog Latte and Peppermint Mocha Truffles. Ironically, Starbucks Chocolates ($2.99 and up) are available at Target, Wal-Mart and even drugstores, but not at Starbucks.
In an effort to raise breast cancer awareness, Aura and Chicago area Jewel stores have partnered to sell Clip 'n' Go Mints and Gum, with innovative vibrant pink packaging designed to clip the mints or gum to the outside of bags, backpacks, purses and key rings. A portion of sales benefits the National Breast Cancer Foundation. Visit www.newerabrands.com.

Sandy Thorn Clark is a locally based free-lance writer.
http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/food/973757,FOO-News-candy28.article


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Tuesday, May 27, 2008
M&M’s come out of their shell
DANDY CANDY They’re latest chocolate brand to sweeten appeal to fashion
May 26, 2008

BY CHERYL V. JACKSON cjackson@suntimes.com

M&M's are delivering a statement for those who find the red, yellow or green shells of the regular candies not fashionable enough.
The maker of M&M's, already the nation's most consumed chocolate brand, is using premium chocolate, dressing it in a marbleized candy shell to resemble gemstones (one color per box), and packaging it in an hour-glass-shaped box — an overture to women, who buy the most chocolate.


This is the M&M’s Premium booth at the All Candy Expo at McCormick Place last week. The maker is catering to the fastest-growing chocolate segment. (Keith Hale/Sun-Times)


It's the fastest-growing segment of the chocolate business. Sales of premium chocolate, which generally has a higher cacao content, grew 129 percent from 2001 to 2006, to $2 billion, according to marketing research group Mintel. Mintel expects the market to increase by another 73 percent by 2011.

"When you look at the landscape and the workplace, premiumization is evolving a lot. Look at the types of cars we buy to the coffee we drink; these are more everyday items, and the average American can have easy access to the premium items," Bowling said.

Mars' Dove brand, which is extending its Promises line to include bananas foster, tiramisu and dark chocolate with almond flavors, is the category leader.

Hershey, taking aim at the bagged premium chocolate category, launched Bliss in March. The company is tying the product to the May 30 opening of the "Sex and the City" movie.
Hershey recently began making Starbucks-branded chocolates.
"We did have this trade-up segment, and people have wondered where we were," said Jody Cook, spokesperson for the Hershey Co.
M&M's Premiums will come in mocha, triple chocolate, raspberry almond, chocolate almond and mint chocolate flavors and will sell for about $4 a box beginning in June.

M&M's have been undergoing lower-scale variety changes, as well, with flavors like cherry and last summer's raspberry among limited-edition releases. The brand currently has a limited edition of mint crisps, a tie-in with the latest Indiana Jones film.

Limited edition offerings allow the company to assess potential permanent additions, Bowling said.
Dark chocolate was a limited-edition flavor that's now in the regular lineup.
Hershey's Kisses chocolate also is changing flavors more frequently. For about 80 years, the Kisses came in a single variety, the original solid milk chocolate. An almond flavor was launched in 1990, followed by Hugs — a chocolate Kiss wrapped in white chocolate — in 1993, and other varieties since, some as limited editions.

Dark chocolate began as a limited-edition flavor in 2002 and became a permanent offering a year later.
Hershey's also works with stores to create exclusive flavors. Last fall, only Target carried its candy corn Kisses. This year, the flavor will be available to other retailers.

Hershey's has an almond variety of its new Bliss candy offered only at Wal-Mart stores.
"It's a relationship builder," Cook said.
http://www.suntimes.com/business/970926,candy052608.article


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Friday, May 23, 2008
Nestlé: Grownups Love Wonka Candy

Brandweek
May 23, 2008

By Mike Beirne
Nestlé managers discovered that they had ignored a key consumer demographic for their Wonka sugar candy products: adults. Through research the company found that Wonka sweets like Nerds, Spree and Laffy Taffy—which targeted tweens since Nestlé bought the Willy Wonka Candy Factory in 1988—also are being gobbled up by grownups as old as 35.

Women, in particular, indexed heavily for SweeTarts. The Wonka brand carries certain sentimental value for consumers in association with the 1971 film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, followed by the 2005 release of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Wonka candy fans include not only kids, but also the generation that is reliving its childhood with nostalgic candy.

Currently, Nestlé and lead agency Dailey & Associates, West Hollywood, Calif., are tinkering with a Wonka campaign to target older teens, college-aged candy lovers and young adults, in addition to tweens, said company reps. The 10-year-old TV, online and POP effort features Wonka as an animated candy genius who shows off his factory's innovations.

Nestlé's measured media spending for the Wonka brand was $7.6 million last year, down from $11.6 million in 2006, per Nielsen Monitor-Plus.Among new products arriving on retail shelves this September is Wonka Tinglerz— pieces of popping milk chocolate candy and rice crispies. In an effort to boost the Nerds franchise, Nestlé last month introduced a jellybean extension called Giant Chewy Nerds.

Ad support for the Nerds SKU includes TV, sampling and Webisodes on Wonka.com. Nerds sales at grocery, drug and mass outlets (excluding Wal-Mart) declined 17% to 26 million units for the year ended April 20, per Information Resources Inc., Chicago.Wonka's big brands also include Laffy Taffy—up 10% to 12.3 million units sold—and SweeTarts—down 12% to 14.3 million units sold, per IRI.
http://www.brandweek.com/bw/news/recent_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003807935


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Thursday, May 22, 2008
Is candy rule really needed?

Philip Wolf, The Daily News (Nanaimo) Published: Thursday, May 22, 2008

What's the best part of any parade?

The impressive floats? The marching bands? The wacky costumes on the service club members? The cheesy politicians doing the "screwing in the lightbulb" wave?
If you're a kid, the answer is easy: The candy.

You're not sitting there for an hour or three in the blazing sunshine without the potential for some sort of reward.
The time-honoured tradition of the mad scramble for a stale Dubble Bubble (circa 1977) keeps the adrenaline flowing.

The thought of getting that treasured balloon from Johnny's Teacup Warehouse . . . magic.
At Nanaimo's annual Empire Days parade on Sunday, it was a dentist's delight - nary a candy in sight.
In fact, hardly a giveaway at all. The odd deck of cards from the casino float, a few mascot masks from a financial institution and that's about it.
Where's the fun in that, you ask?
Well, several of you did, so I went about finding the answer, and it's a simple one.

Ron Lillie doesn't want any dead bodies.
Lillie, chairman of the Empire Days parade, said the process of doling out the candy is simply too dangerous.
He said if the candy is tossed too close to the wheels of a moving vehicle "babies suddenly see it and dive for it."
He said he has personally witnessed several close calls.
"It's strictly a safety issue," he said.
Personally, I don't see a problem with the tossing of candy from the floats, even in Nanaimo.

Most kids understand the merits of not running in front of a moving vehicle.
Most folks on a float understand the merits of tossing the candies far from the vehicles (which aren't exactly moving like the Mach 5 either).
"It's OK in Victoria, where there's a long distance (between the floats and the crowd)," said Lillie. "In Nanaimo, the streets are just too narrow."
Now, before we categorize the Nanaimo organizers as overzealous fun police, accidents happen.

A nine-year-old boy was killed last year at a Christmas parade in Plant City, Fla., run over as he reached for a wayward sweet tossed from a float.
Other parades throughout North America also have rules against tossing candy.

Lillie said marshals will often turn a blind eye to giveaways (still technically not allowed) if they involve people walking to the curbs to safely hand out the goodies.

It would be easy to argue that sends a mixed message. What happens if little Jenny decides that she wants a balloon animal from Chuckles the Clown (who was handing them out safely) and starts chasing him down the road, only to get clipped by the Precision Pogo Stick Squad?
A lot of it seems to bring to mind your granny waving her finger at you and warning that "someone's going to lose an eye."

Are organizers being overprotective or unnecessarily cautious?
Or are they simply being prudent, since any accident is one too many?
Interesting call. Choosing to err on the side of caution isn't a bad strategy in this case.
Either way, the parade is always a good time (for geezers like me anyway) and a credit to the hard work of the organizers and the participants.
But it would be a lot better if they figured out a way to allow more goodies.

Right kids?
Philip Wolf's column runs regularly in this space. If you would like to comment on his opinion, send your letter to letters@
nanaimodailynews.com
http://www.canada.com/nanaimodailynews/story.html?id=3b9099f4-b8d0-4806-9e1b-df58b0896867


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Saturday, May 17, 2008
Alleged burglar done in by half-eaten candy bar
AP

JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) — A Snickers bar did in one Arkansas burglar. Police in Jonesboro said Brian D. Bass, 39, left the half-eaten candy bar on a counter at the Cato Animal Hospital during a Jan. 24 robbery.
Detective Jason Simpkins said police sent the chocolate and peanut treat to the state Crime Laboratory in Little Rock, where scientists pulled off a DNA sample.

Simpkins said the DNA matched a sample taken from Bass, who had served time on another charge. The detective said Bass later confessed to the crime during an interview.

Bass now faces felony commercial burglary and theft charges. Sheriff's deputies said Bass remained in Craighead County jail Friday in lieu of $50,000 bond. State officials say Bass was already on probation after most recently serving prison time for being a felon in possession of a firearm.

The Craighead County Public Defender's Office said Friday that Bass had yet to be assigned an attorney.

However, the Snickers bar apparently did not alleviate Bass' hunger.
"It was also discovered that the suspect involved ate two cans of Vienna sausages," Simpkins said.


Copyright © 2008 The Associated Press
http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5ijCi4aevS11GMSJ0QAJz15fhvikQD90MU79O1


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Friday, May 16, 2008
Cadbury forecasts higher sales, profit margins

By JANE WARDELL 05.15.08, 12:53 PM ET
Forbes

LONDON -
Cadbury PLC, the world's biggest candy maker, gave investors a pleasant surprise Thursday by forecasting target-beating sales in the first half and improving profit margins on the back of price increases and lower costs.
Cadbury shares jumped nearly 4 percent after the trading statement from the maker of Dairy Milk chocolate, Trident gum and Halls cough drops, which followed the company's first board meeting since it spun off its U.S. beverage business.
"Following the demerger, I am very pleased to confirm that the new company is off to a strong start with revenues in the first half expected to be above the top end of our goal range and trading margins around 150 basis points ahead," Chairman John Sunderland said.
"This performance reflects the combination of increased marketing investment, higher pricing and successful early execution of our cost reduction initiatives," Sunderland said.
Its shares rose 3.9 percent to 672 pence ($13.08) in trading in London.
Cadbury has announced plans to close 15 percent of its confectionary factories by 2011, cutting around 7,500 jobs, and shift its headquarters to London's outskirts to cut costs amid rising input charges thanks to surging dairy and cocoa prices.
The company has come under pressure due to the $23 billion takeover by Mars Inc. of Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. announced earlier this month.
That deal - bringing together brands including Snickers, M&Ms, Juicy Fruit, Orbit, Extra and Big Red - will create a company that will leapfrog Cadbury to be the world's largest confectionary business.
Cadbury currently has 10.1 percent of the market. The combined Mars-Wrigley would have 14.1 percent.
In light of the Mars-Wrigley deal, analysts have speculated that Cadbury will seek a deal with The Hershey Co. A matchup between the pair would be mutually beneficial - Cadbury lacks Hershey's U.S. presence, while Hershey lacks Cadbury's global reach.
That would push Cadbury back into the No. 1 spot, as the combined company would hold a 15.6 percent share of the global candy market.
If that fails, analysts said Cadbury could be a takeover target itself with Kraft Foods Inc. named as a likely suitor.
Investec analyst Martin Deboo said the unplanned trading update is "both significant and positive for the shares."
"We expect to upgrade our 2008 forecasts on this news," he said, noting that the 150 basis point margin increase in the first half suggests Cadbury is "likely to meet at least" consensus expectations of 100-plus basis point margin growth over the full year.
Cadbury also announced a series of senior appointments on Thursday.
Guy Elliott, currently chairman of the company's audit committee, will become senior independent director when Roger Carr takes over from Sunderland as chairman in July.
Bob Stack, executive director and chief human resources officer, will retire at the end of the year, the company said. The board has started a search for two new non-executive directors, one of whom will be appointed chairman of the audit committee, it added.
The other half of Cadbury Schweppes, the North American beverage business now called Dr Pepper Snapple Group Inc., began trading last week on the New York Stock Exchange.

http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2008/05/15/ap5014683.html


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Monday, May 12, 2008

Associated Press - May 12, 2008 1:24 PM ET
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - A 20-year-old Drake University student from Illinois is charged with assaulting a police officer - with candy.
Officials say Sean McGuire of Glenview was arrested Sunday at a convenience store. He's accused of throwing several M&M's at a Des Moines police officer, who was investigating a hit & run accident.
Police reports say Drake security guards noticed the candies falling on the ground around the officer. When the officer turned around, 1 of the candies hit his shoulder.
Authorities say McGuire claims he threw the candy because he was "sticking up for his friend," who apparently was the man suspected in the accident.
McGuire is out on bond. He didn't return a call seeking comment.
Information from: The Des Moines Register, http://www.desmoinesregister.com


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Thursday, May 8, 2008
By GREG BLUESTEIN Associated Press

ATLANTA — Selling marijuana-flavored candy to children will net the seller a $500 fine under a ban that may be the first of its kind in the nation.
Gov. Sonny Perdue signed a law Wednesday banning the sale of “marijuana flavored products” to minors. It slaps violators with a misdemeanor and imposes a fine of up to $500 for each offense.
The law, which takes effect July 1, targets businesses that sell candies with drug-inspired names such as “Kronic Kandy” and “Pot Suckers.” Those candies, the measure says, give children the “false impression that marijuana is fun and safe.”
Vote Hemp, a national organization that promotes the use of hemp products and tracks legislation, says the law would make Georgia the first state to ban the sale of the candy to minors.Marketers argue that the pot-flavored sweets are a harmless novelty and say they advise retailers to sell the stuff only to customers 18 or older. They say the candies are flavored with hemp essential oil, a legal product that gives them the taste of marijuana but doesn’t make the user intoxicated.
Tom Murphy, Vote Hemp’s national outreach coordinator, called the Georgia measure flawed and warned it could damage the “legitimate and legal hemp food industry.”
“This law may unintentionally ban hemp foods and other hemp products in Georgia as well,” said Murphy. He added that the law could also apply to hemp foods such as hemp milk, hemp granola and even cosmetics such as lip balm made with hemp.
The measure warns in a preamble that marijuana flavored candy may serve as a “gateway” to use of marijuana and other illegal drugs, and asserts that merchants selling the candy are “creating new customers for drug dealers.”
“The sale of marijuana flavored products, including lollipops and gum drops, which claim ‘every lick is like taking a hit’ is a marketing ploy that perpetuates an unhealthy culture and should not be permitted in the state of Georgia,” it reads.
Backers of the bill also warned that some dealers were luring children by selling them pieces of the candy.
One of the sponsors, state Rep. Judy Manning, R-Marietta, told lawmakers, “They’re selling for $4 to $8 apiece. It’s quite expensive and it’s quite detrimental to our children.”
A handful of communities have enacted similar bans.
New Jersey lawmakers passed a resolution in 2005 urging the state attorney general to investigate the issue, according to Vote Hemp. The sale of marijuana-flavored candies has also been outlawed in Chicago, Suffolk County, N.Y., Schaumburg, Ill., and parts of Alameda County, Calif.
Perdue’s signature marked the end of a three-year effort in Georgia to target marijuana-flavored candy.A similar measure passed the House last year but never reached a vote in the Senate. And a 2006 effort that would have banned all sales of the candy and threatened repeat offenders with prison time never reached a vote.

http://news.jacksonville.com/justin/2008/05/07/georgia-bans-sale-of-pot-flavored-candy-to-kids/


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Tuesday, May 6, 2008
Candy company garners national attention

By Tom MurphyRocky Mount Telegram
Saturday, May 03, 2008

A Nashville candy manufacturer has received national acclaim.
Butterfields Candy Co. was featured on the Rachael Ray show as the "Snack of the Day" in April. Butterfields is a Sweet Concepts Co., based in the Nashville-Momeyer area.



"How many times have you picked up somebody from the airport, and they said, 'Hey, what about some of that North Carolina barbecue?'" Brooks West III, also known as J.W. Butterfield, said. "And the mission is on. And now there's a new twist on North Carolina foods – Butterfields hand-made hard candy."
Butterfields has been making hard candy history for more than eight decades, said West, owner and president of the company.
Butterfields practices capitalism in its truest sense, West said.
"Our company was founded in 1924 and continues to practice the Old World art of making hard-boiled sweets – commonly called hard candy," he said.
Butterfields markets to thousands of upscale food stores, gift basket specialists and other outlets across the country and overseas. The privately held company uses only products produced in the United States to manufacture more than 14 varieties of fruit-flavored hard candy under the brand name Buds and new products, like white chocolate Peach Bark and Peppermint Bursts.
U.S. candy makers, faced with high sugar prices, are finding it difficult to manufacture candy, Brooks said.
"We need to level the playing fields," he said. "U.S. candy makers pay almost 40 cents a pound for sugar while it costs eight to 12 cents per pound in other countries.
"The rising costs of gas and shipping also are up."
Rachael Ray is picking smaller, high-quality goods to feature, like Butterfields candy which is not shown all over the country like Snickers, for instance, West said. Dealing with Ray was a positive experience, he said.
"We still make candy by the batch, using pure cane sugar, with a combination of flavors abandoned by bigger companies because of cost," he said. "We make our candy in shiny, copper kettles.
"People try it. They like it and tell friends and neighbors, who tell their friends and neighbors. The tiny company that put Momeyer on the map is now famous from Manteo to Monterey, Calif."
Twice in recent years, Butterfields Candy has been a finalist in National Confectioners Concoction competitions and won twice during a Fancy Food Shop competition in New York.
West, a Tennessee native, bought Butterfields after acquiring the Wilson Candy Co., a candy company in New York and Shaker Country Meadowsweets.
"We moved out here in 1999 and built on to this factory," he said. "This is a good business on the rise."
West uses some money from sales to support the American Cancer Society.
"Many patients on chemotherapy lose their taste buds, and many enjoy our candy," he said.
West is a strong supporter of creating a level playing field in the United States candy industry.
"Involvement can help save jobs in the candy industry," he said. "It's our candy and our country."

http://www.rockymounttelegram.com/local/content/news/stories/2008/05/03/candy.html


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Candy company garners national attention

By Tom MurphyRocky Mount Telegram
Saturday, May 03, 2008

A Nashville candy manufacturer has received national acclaim.
Butterfields Candy Co. was featured on the Rachael Ray show as the "Snack of the Day" in April. Butterfields is a Sweet Concepts Co., based in the Nashville-Momeyer area.



"How many times have you picked up somebody from the airport, and they said, 'Hey, what about some of that North Carolina barbecue?'" Brooks West III, also known as J.W. Butterfield, said. "And the mission is on. And now there's a new twist on North Carolina foods – Butterfields hand-made hard candy."
Butterfields has been making hard candy history for more than eight decades, said West, owner and president of the company.
Butterfields practices capitalism in its truest sense, West said.
"Our company was founded in 1924 and continues to practice the Old World art of making hard-boiled sweets – commonly called hard candy," he said.
Butterfields markets to thousands of upscale food stores, gift basket specialists and other outlets across the country and overseas. The privately held company uses only products produced in the United States to manufacture more than 14 varieties of fruit-flavored hard candy under the brand name Buds and new products, like white chocolate Peach Bark and Peppermint Bursts.
U.S. candy makers, faced with high sugar prices, are finding it difficult to manufacture candy, Brooks said.
"We need to level the playing fields," he said. "U.S. candy makers pay almost 40 cents a pound for sugar while it costs eight to 12 cents per pound in other countries.
"The rising costs of gas and shipping also are up."
Rachael Ray is picking smaller, high-quality goods to feature, like Butterfields candy which is not shown all over the country like Snickers, for instance, West said. Dealing with Ray was a positive experience, he said.
"We still make candy by the batch, using pure cane sugar, with a combination of flavors abandoned by bigger companies because of cost," he said. "We make our candy in shiny, copper kettles.
"People try it. They like it and tell friends and neighbors, who tell their friends and neighbors. The tiny company that put Momeyer on the map is now famous from Manteo to Monterey, Calif."
Twice in recent years, Butterfields Candy has been a finalist in National Confectioners Concoction competitions and won twice during a Fancy Food Shop competition in New York.
West, a Tennessee native, bought Butterfields after acquiring the Wilson Candy Co., a candy company in New York and Shaker Country Meadowsweets.
"We moved out here in 1999 and built on to this factory," he said. "This is a good business on the rise."
West uses some money from sales to support the American Cancer Society.
"Many patients on chemotherapy lose their taste buds, and many enjoy our candy," he said.
West is a strong supporter of creating a level playing field in the United States candy industry.
"Involvement can help save jobs in the candy industry," he said. "It's our candy and our country."

http://www.rockymounttelegram.com/local/content/news/stories/2008/05/03/candy.html


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Thursday, May 1, 2008
Omaha, NE--Dentists say there's all sorts of reasons why they're still seeing plenty of cavities in children and adults. It can be due to poor oral hygiene, lack of fluoride from drinking too much bottled water, genetics, an overgrowth of the bacteria in the mouth that causes cavities, or all of the above.

In fact, Dr. Christopher Stanosheck says for about ten to fifteen percent of the population, no matter what they do, cavities are going to happen.
But he says one of the most promising ways to fight tooth decay comes in a lollipop.

It's been developed by dentists at UCLA using licorice root extract--an ancient Chinese herb used for centuries for its antibacterial qualities.
"This particular lollipop has the minimum inhibitory microbiological concentration of licorice root. All that means is it has a specific amount to kill streptococcus mutans, the bacteria that causes cavities," relays Dr. Stanosheck.

The orange-flavored candy is sugar-free and is meant to be given out twice a day for 10 days. That dose is supposed to be enough to inhibit tooth decay for three to six months. According to the manufacturer, the candy needs to stay in the mouth for at least five minutes to kill the germs.

"I'm all for giving them the sucker," says mom, Stephanie Thiem. "Cavities run in our family."

Her three-year old daughter, Annabelle, seems to like the idea as well.
14-year old Tommy Volberding declares, "I would eat them every day...cause I don't want to sit in this chair." That's after finding out that he has two new cavities.

Dr. Stanosheck is quick to remind people, this does not take the place of regular brushing and flossing. "It is something to help out, a natural holistic way to help out someone who can't fight cavities as well as other people."

He also thinks it would be a great alternative for adults who chew ice, gum or smoke.

The cost runs about ten dollars for 20 lollipops and right now, you can only buy it through a dental office or through the manufacturer. Because it is an herbal extract, there is no requirement for FDA approval.

Reported by Carol Wang, cwang@action3news.com
http://www.action3news.com/Global/story.asp?S=8253126


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